Sunday , December 17 2017
Home / Africa Updated / STANDING AGAINST STEREOTYPES, LOVING WEIRDNESS.

STANDING AGAINST STEREOTYPES, LOVING WEIRDNESS.

As human beings, there are certain things that influence the way we talk, the way we dress, the way we walk, even the way we live our lives, but most especially, the way we view the world around us, and by the world I mean the people. Amongst such things we have the family upbringing, i.e. the background, we have peer pressure, just to mention a few. Now to me, the biggest influence of all is the society, the stereotypes that are passed down from generation to generation with no idea of their genesis. The society just tells us that certain things are unacceptable and we accept without question because we were born into these stereotypes that we feel that it’s the norm, just the way things are. We become afraid to question these ‘norms’ and those who dare to are seen as rebels and black sheep.

Personally, I hate stereotypes and I love to question what seems to be the norm. I’m not one to accept a principle or value just because that’s the way it is. For instance you ask why some things are wrong and the reply always is, “I don’t know. It just is.” I’m not afraid to push boundaries, to be classified as weird; I love being different.

So, are we comfortable living in a closeted world, where virtually everything is either black or white and there are no shades of grey? Are we okay being close-minded, refusing to see past the values we’ve been spoon fed? Are we afraid of change?… Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying that society is wrong in the values they pass on, but we must learn to question why. Why do we see a guy who makes his hair or wears an earring as irresponsible? Why do we quickly assume that a girl with a nose ring is a whore or as we Nigerians call it, a runz girl? Why do we quickly condemn a girl who wears an anklet to be a lesbian? Why are well dressed guys seen as gays? There is no apparent reason for these conclusions we come to just by looking at a person. Ok so it’s possible that these stereotypes came as a result of truth; maybe most guys who braid their hair are actually irresponsible but they are irresponsible because it’s their attitude, who they are. It is not the hair that made him irresponsible; it is not the nose ring that made her a whore. Why then should I be judged if I just happen to like nose rings the way certain people like necklaces?

You might be wondering now, so what the hell is your point? I’m simply saying, let’s not judge people too quickly, especially at face value. Let’s learn to question why certain things are the way they are. Let’s not be afraid of change. Be open-minded and love. I’ll leave y’all with a line from Ed-sheeran’s song, ‘what do I know’, “love can change the world in a moment.” Let’s love. Lots of love from me to you!

xoxoxoxo

About Okonkwo

Just a controversial girl with a lot of thoughts and plenty to say. She refuses to conform to norms and stereotypes

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